Human Rights XXXL

BBC Will Dramatize Tales of the City: 10 Day Countdown

Perusing through Facebook today unearthed a magical Madrigal gem. The much loved Anna Madrigal, and the rest of Armistead Maupin‘s beloved  Tales of the City characters, will be brought to life on the air by the BBC beginning Jan. 28. The only catch is they air at 2:45 a.m. San Francisco time.

tales of the city, mary anne singleon, mouse

Tales of the City, Brought to your ears in full technicolor by the BBC starting Jan. 28th

Regardless of the time, it will be worth getting up to stream these on my computer. That’s the good news, even though we can’t get the BBC through the radio, proper, these will be available online. To hear them, you can click here.

And let your friends in the UK know as they will be airing at a more decent hour local time, 10:45 a.m.

To keep up with Armistead you can follow him on Facebook.

Fairy dust with Mona and her mini-hoover. Love this scene!


:( LGBT Advocate and Advice Columnist, Dear Abby Dies

From the Advocate: Pauline Friedman Phillips, who as advice columnist Dear Abby often advocated for acceptance of LGBT people, has died at age 94, the Associated Press reports.

Phillips, who had Alzheimer’s disease, died Wednesday in Minneapolis, and private funeral services were held today, her publicist said.

Dear Abby talks about her big break on Larry King Live

 

dear abby


SFO Renamed to Harvey Milk International Airport…YES! YES! YES! (?)

An SF Supervisor wants to rename the San Francisco International Airport in honor of civil rights leader Harvey Milk, sending a global message that SF is a beacon of hope for gays and lesbians everywhere. Bearron.com is giving this a huge thumbs up!

From the SF Gate:  Supervisor David Campos will introduce legislation Tuesday that would place the proposal to rename San Francisco International Airport as Harvey Milk San Francisco International Airport before voters in November. To send the name change to voters, Campos needs the support of five other supervisors, and Monday he already had four co-sponsors.

To keep up to date with this topic and other important issues join the Harvey Milk Foundation on Facebook.

Included below is Harvey Milk’s Hope Speech. If you haven’t read it, please do.

Harvey Milk International Airport

Harvey Milk International Airport…Yes, Please!

 

 

My name is Harvey Milk and I’m here to recruit you.

I’ve been saying this one for years. It’s a political joke. I can’t help it–I’ve got to tell it. I’ve never been able to talk to this many political people before, so if I tell you nothing else you may be able to go home laughing a bit.

This ocean liner was going across the ocean and it sank. And there was one little piece of wood floating and three people swam to it and they realized only one person could hold on to it. So they had a little debate about which was the person. It so happened that the three people were the Pope, the President, and Mayor Daley. The Pope said he was titular head of one of the greatest religions of the world and he was spiritual adviser to many, many millions and he went on and pontificated and they thought it was a good argument. Then the President said he was leader of the largest and most powerful nation of the world. What takes place in this country affects the whole world and they thought that was a good argument. And Mayor Daley said he was mayor of the backbone of the Untied States and what took place in Chicago affected the world, and what took place in the archdiocese of Chicago affected Catholicism. And they thought that was a good argument. So they did it the democratic way and voted. And Daley won, seven to two.

About six months ago, Anita Bryant in her speaking to God said that the drought in California was because of the gay people. On November 9, the day after I got elected, it started to rain. On the day I got sworn in, we walked to City Hall and it was kinda nice, and as soon as I said the word “I do,” it started to rain again. It’s been raining since then and the people of San Francisco figure the only way to stop it is to do a recall petition. That’s the local joke.

So much for that. Why are we here? Why are gay people here? And what’s happening? What’s happening to me is the antithesis of what you read about in the papers and what you hear about on the radio. You hear about and read about this movement to the right. That we must band together and fight back this movement to the right. And I’m here to go ahead and say that what you hear and read is what they want you to think because it’s not happening. The major media in this country has talked about the movement to the right so the legislators think that there is indeed a movement to the right and that the Congress and the legislators and the city councils will start to move to the right the way the major media want them. So they keep on talking about this move to the right.

So let’s look at 1977 and see if there was indeed a move to the right. In 1977, gay people had their rights taken away from them in Miami. But you must remember that in the week before Miami and the week after that, the word homosexual or gay appeared in every single newspaper in this nation in articles both pro and con. In every radio station, in every TV station and every household. For the first time in the history of the world, everybody was talking about it, good or bad. Unless you have dialogue, unless you open the walls of dialogue, you can never reach to change people’s opinion. In those two weeks, more good and bad, but more about the word homosexual and gay was written than probably in the history of mankind. Once you have dialogue starting, you know you can break down prejudice. In 1977 we saw a dialogue start. In 1977, we saw a gay person elected in San Francisco. In 1977 we saw the state of Mississippi decriminalize marijuana. In 1977, we saw the convention of conventions in Houston. And I want to know where the movement to the right is happening.

What that is is a record of what happened last year. What we must do is make sure that 1978 continues the movement that is really happening that the media don’t want you to know about. That is the movement to the left. It’s up to CDC to put the pressures on Sacramento–but to break down the walls and the barriers so the movement to the left continues and progress continues in the nation. We have before us coming up several issues we must speak out on. Probably the most important issue outside the Briggs–which we will come to–but we do know what will take place this June. We know there’s an issue on the ballot called Jarvis-Gann. We hear the taxpayers talk about it on both sides. But what you don’t hear is that it’s probably the most racist issue on the ballot in a long time. In the city and county of San Francisco, if it passes and we indeed have to lay off people, who will they be? The last in, and the first in, and who are the last in but the minorities? Jarvis-Gann is a racist issue. We must address that issue. We must not talk away from it. We must not allow them to talk about the money it’s going to save, because look at who’s going to save the money and who’s going to get hurt.

We also have another issue that we’ve started in some of the north counties and I hope in some of the south counties it continues. In San Francisco elections we’re asking–at least we hope to ask– that the U.S. government put pressure on the closing of the South African consulate. That must happen. There is a major difference between an embassy in Washington which is a diplomatic bureau. and a consulate in major cities. A consulate is there for one reason only — to promote business, economic gains, tourism, investment. And every time you have business going to South Africa, you’re promoting a regime that’s offensive.

In the city of San Francisco, if everyone of 51 percent of that city were to go to South Africa, they would be treated as second-class citizens. That is an offense to the people of San Francisco and I hope all my colleagues up there will take every step we can to close down that consulate and hope that people in other parts of the state follow us in that lead. The battles must be started some place and CDC is the greatest place to start the battles. I know we are pressed for time so I’m going to cover just one more little point. That is to understand why it is important that gay people run for office and that gay people get elected. I know there are many people in this room who are running for central committee who are gay. I encourage you. There’s a major reason why. If my non-gay friends and supporters in this room understand it, they’ll probably understand why I’ve run so often before I finally made it. Y’see right now, there’s a controversy going on in this convention about the gay governor. Is he speaking out enough? Is he strong enough for gay rights? And there is controversy and for us to say it is not would be foolish. Some people are satisfied and some people are not.

You see there is am major difference–and it remains a vital difference–between a friend and a gay person, a friend in office and a gay person in office. Gay people have been slandered nationwide. We’ve been tarred and we’ve been brushed with the picture of pornography. In Dade County, we were accused of child molestation. It’s not enough anymore just to have friends represent us. No matter how good that friend may be.

The black community made up its mind to that a long time ago. That the myths against blacks can only be dispelled by electing black leaders, so the black community could be judged by the leaders and not by the myths or black criminals. The Spanish community must not be judged by Latin criminals or myths. The Asian community must not be judged by Asian criminals or myths. The Italian community must not be judged by the mafia, myths. And the time has come when the gay community must not be judged by our criminals and myths.

Like every other group, we must be judged by our leaders and by those who are themselves gay, those who are visible. For invisible, we remain in limbo–a myth, a person with no parents, no brothers, no sisters, no friends who are straight, no important positions in employment. A tenth of the nation supposedly composed of stereotypes and would-be seducers of children–and no offense meant to the stereotypes. But today, the black community is not judged by its friends, but by its black legislators and leaders. And we must give people the chance to judge us by our leaders and legislators. A gay person in office can set a tone, con command respect not only from the larger community, but from the young people in our own community who need both examples and hope.

The first gay people we elect must be strong. They must not be content to sit in the back of the bus. They must not be content to accept pablum. They must be above wheeling and dealing. They must be–for the good of all of us–independent, unbought. The anger and the frustrations that some of us feel is because we are misunderstood, and friends can’t feel the anger and frustration. They can sense it in us, but they can’t feel it. Because a friend has never gone through what is known as coming out. I will never forget what it was like coming out and having nobody to look up toward. I remember the lack of hope–and our friends can’t fulfill it.

I can’t forget the looks on faces of people who’ve lost hope. Be they gay, be they seniors, be they blacks looking for an almost-impossilbe job, be they Latins trying to explain their problems and aspirations in a tongue that’s foreign to them. I personally will never forget that people are more important than buildings. I use the word “I” because I’m proud. I stand here tonight in front of my gay sisters, brothers and friends because I’m proud of you. I think it’s time that we have many legislators who are gay and proud of that fact and do not have to remain in the closet. I think that a gay person, up-front, will not walk away from a responsibility and be afraid of being tossed out of office. After Dade County, I walked among the angry and the frustrated night after night and I looked at their faces. And in San Francisco, three days before Gay Pride Day, a person was killed just because he was gay. And that night, I walked among the sad and the frustrated at City Hall in San Francisco and later that night as they lit candles on Castro Street and stood in silence, reaching out for some symbolic thing that would give them hope. These were strong people, whose faces I knew from the shop, the streets, meetings and people who I never saw before but I knew. They were strong, but even they needed hope.

And the young gay people in the Altoona, Pennsylvanias and the Richmond, Minnesotas who are coming out and hear Anita Bryant on television and her story. The only thing they have to look forward to is hope. And you have to give them hope. Hope for a better world, hope for a better tomorrow, hope for a better place to come to if the pressures at home are too great. Hope that all will be all right. Without hope, not only gays, but the blacks, the seniors, the handicapped, the us’es, the us’es will give up. And if you help elect to the central committee and other offices, more gay people, that gives a green light to all who feel disenfranchised, a green light to move forward. It means hope to a nation that has given up, because if a gay person makes it, the doors are open to everyone.

So if there is a message I have to give, it is that I’ve found one overriding thing about my personal election, it’s the fact that if a gay person can be elected, it’s a green light. And you and you and you, you have to give people hope. Thank you very much.

 

 


Jodie Foster Comes Out 2013 and 2007, Versions

This is just one of those things every gay blog should have. Jodie Foster comes out 2013 video at the Golden Globes– via Towleroad.   As you may know, Jodie Foster first came out in 2007, more subtly. I’m curious to see how her ‘official’ coming out is received in 2013.

Towleroad seems to be lagging. There  is a better video here for her 2013 coming out on Perez Hilton.com

A young Jodie foster rocking it with the other Foxes

A young Jodie foster rocking it with the other Foxes

The video below has her ‘sort of’ coming out in 2007, where she thanks here beautiful Cydney.


fund for Gay college students, Good idea?

I, for one, think a fund that gets Gay youth to college is not a good ideas, it’s a fucking fantastic idea. Apparently, an organization called the Point Foundation has been doing this for 10 years.

Point Foundation Celebrates 10 Years

What do you know/think about the Point Foundation? Curious to hear from anyone intimately knowledgeable on them, through an experience of their own or someone close to them.

The video on the Point Foundations is beyond emotional. Truly touching. You have been warned.

And I quote from the video:

“Setting a counter example to all of our young people who don’t think  they can be anything and be out at the same time.”

According to Wikipedia,

The Point Foundation is the first and largest national foundation to support academic achievement in higher education among lesbiangaybisexual and transgender students by providing financial support, mentoring and hope to meritorious students who are marginalized due to sexual orientation, gender expression or gender identity.

A Point Scholarship is the most substantive academic award of its kind, in most cases covering the cost of tuition, books, supplies, room and board, transportation and living expenses. The comprehensive scholarships allow students to excel in the classroom, on campus and in their communities. In addition, Point Scholars are matched with mentors from the professional world who serve as positive role models and provide personal support, ensuring that students build a foundation of leadership skills they can use throughout their careers.


snapshots xxxl: Rick Santorum’s Face Made Out Of Gay Porn

Rick Santorum never looked so good.  As featured on the Conjecturer tumblr feed, this is pretty awesome.  The photo speaks for itself.

Rick Santorum's Face Made out of gay porn


Really, Canada? Transgendered People Not Allowed to Fly

It seems our neighbors to the north are putting a freeze on transgender travelers. According to some bloggers this rule has been in place since July, however it has yet to be enforced on anyone.

According the blog Jezebel,

This regulation was part of a larger set of rules put into place by the Minister of Transportation, Denis Lebel, who happens to be a conservative. (Surprise!) He required no approval from the Canadian parliament to implement them, which explains why no one was aware this was even a problem until recently.

In another blog post from Chris Malloy,

The shit hit the fan in the trans blogosphere last night, when it came to light that there is a disturbing new section in the Identity Screening Regulations used in airports throughout Canada. Simply put, Transgender People are Completely Banned From Boarding Airplanes in Canada.

The offending section of the regulations reads:

5.2 (1) An air carrier shall not transport a passenger if …
(c) the passenger does not appear to be of the gender indicated on the identification he or she presents;

So what does this mean? Well, in order to change the ‘sex’ designation on a Canadian Passport, the federal government requires proof that surgery has taken place, or will take place within one year. So for non-operative transgender persons, for gender nonconforming (genderqueer) persons, and for the vast majority of pre-operative transsexual persons, it is literally impossible to obtain proper travel documentation marked with the sex designation which “matches” the gender identity in which they live.


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